Floral Wizardry of Riz Reyes

A familiar face in the Pacific Northwest horticultural scene, horticulturist Riz Reyes increasingly concentrates on his floral art outside of his full-time job as the garden manager for McMenamins Anderson, Bothell, Washington State. Reyes employs flowers and foliage locally as much as possible, and his adroit skills in creating sumptuous floral arrangements can be witnessed in his top ten favorites. He offers the following three tenets of his design philosophy:

1.) Cut flowers are a gateway to the art and science of horticulture celebrating the diversity of botanical wonder all around us.

2.) Whether it be texture, scent, or serendipitous movement as the bouquet is being held, floral designers always possess a natural element inspired by nature so anyone can fully engage with the composition.

3.) Acknowledge the hard work it takes to plant, nurture, and harvest the bounty available to floral designers by letting very little go to waste and allow what’s not used to come back to earth to nurture the following season’s growth.

Those who reside in the Seattle metro region are fortunate to have Riz’s talents at your tip of the hat as he is available for floral commissions. Riz can be reached by email at riz@rhrhorticulture.com.

Thank you, Riz!    ~ Eric

Left: Rosa hybrid unknown Clematis 'Etoile de Violette' Achemilla mollis seed heads Cornus elliptica, Lathyrus odoratus vine Phlox paniculata 'Nicky' Astrantia hybrid Allium 'Summer Beauty'; Right: Brunia albiflora Asclepsia curassavica, Schinus molle Akebia quinata 'Alba' Echinacea Supreme(TM) Elegance Fatsia polycarpa 'Needham's Lace' Celosia hybrid

Left: Rosa hybrid unknown, Clematis ‘Etoile de Violette’, Achemilla mollis seed heads, Cornus elliptica, Lathyrus odoratus vine, Phlox paniculata ‘Nicky’, Astrantia hybrid, Allium ‘Summer Beauty’; Right: Brunia albiflora
Asclepsia curassavica, Schinus molle, Akebia quinata ‘Alba’, Echinacea Supreme(TM) Elegance, Fatsia polycarpa ‘Needham’s Lace’, Celosia hybrid

Rosa 'Auspastor' PATIENCE, Rosa 'Helga Piaget' Zantedeschia hybrid, Agonis 'After Dark' foliage, Blechnum spicant foliage, Jacobaea hybrid foliage, Papaver somniferum pods, Scabiosa stellata pods Tillandsia xerographica

Rosa ‘Auspastor’ PATIENCE, Rosa ‘Helga Piaget’, Zantedeschia hybrid, Agonis ‘After Dark’ foliage, Blechnum spicant foliage, Jacobaea hybrid foliage, Papaver somniferum pods, Scabiosa stellata pods, Tillandsia xerographica

Left: Leucodendron 'Inca Gold' Hyacinthus orientalis 'Blue Jacket' Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Nigrescens' Eucalyptus sp. Grevillea 'Ivanhoe' Brunia albiflora Tillandsia xerographica; Right: Dahlia 'Versa' Nelumbo hybrid pods Schinus molle Sorbus forrestii fruit Sorbus caulescens fruit Jacobaea hybrid foliage Euonymous fortunei 'Emerald 'N Gold' Hedera hibernica Eucalyptus sp. Echeveria 'Topsy Turvy' Tillandsia abdita

Left: Leucodendron ‘Inca Gold’, Hyacinthus orientalis ‘Blue Jacket’, Ophiopogon planiscapus ‘Nigrescens’, Eucalyptus sp., Grevillea ‘Ivanhoe’, Brunia albiflora, Tillandsia xerographica; Right: Dahlia ‘Versa’, Nelumbo hybrid pods, Schinus molle, Sorbus forrestii fruit, Sorbus caulescens fruit, Jacobaea hybrid foliage, Euonymous fortunei ‘Emerald ‘N Gold’,
Hedera hibernica, Eucalyptus sp., Echeveria ‘Topsy Turvy’, Tillandsia abdita

Rosa 'Ausdrawn' The Generous Gardener Lathyrus odoratus hybrid, Brunnera macrophylla 'Jack Frost', Astilbe hybrid, Dryopteris felix-mas 'Cristata', Cornus alba 'Elegantissima'

Rosa ‘Ausdrawn’ The Generous Gardener, Lathyrus odoratus hybrid, Brunnera macrophylla ‘Jack Frost’, Astilbe hybrid, Dryopteris felix-mas ‘Cristata’, Cornus alba ‘Elegantissima’

Actaea 'Black Negligee' foliage, Clematis 'Etoile de Violette', Lilium 'Dimension', Allium hybrid seedhead, Astrantia hybrids, Jacobaea hybrid flower buds, Lonicera japonica 'Halliana', Alchemilla mollis seedheads, Lathyrus odoratus tendrils

Actaea ‘Black Negligee’ foliage, Clematis ‘Etoile de Violette’, Lilium ‘Dimension’, Allium hybrid seedhead, Astrantia hybrids, Jacobaea hybrid flower buds, Lonicera japonica ‘Halliana’, Alchemilla mollis seedheads, Lathyrus odoratus tendrils

Rosa hybrid unknown Equisetum hyemale Cornus elliptica Papaver somniferum pods Jacobaea hybrid flowering buds Echeveria sp. Sorbus forrestii fruit Polystichum setiferum 'Plumoso-Multilobum' Blechnum spicant

Rosa hybrid unknown, Equisetum hyemale, Cornus elliptica, Papaver somniferum pods, Jacobaea hybrid flowering buds, Echeveria sp., Sorbus forrestii fruit, Polystichum setiferum ‘Plumoso-Multilobum’, Blechnum spicant

Left: Vitis cognetiae branch with lichen Zantedeschia hybrid Jacobaea hybrid foliage Brunia albiflora Aeonium arboreum hyrbid Akebia quinata 'Alba' Eucomis comosa Tillandsia xerographica x brachyculous Right: Tillandsia xerographica Aeonium arboreum Eucalyptus sp. Leucodendron hybrid Cymbidium hybrid Cornus sericea

Left: Vitis cognetiae branch with lichen, Zantedeschia hybrid, Jacobaea hybrid foliage, Brunia albiflora
Aeonium arboreum hyrbid, Akebia quinata ‘Alba’, Eucomis comosa, Tillandsia xerographica x brachyculous Right: Tillandsia xerographica, Aeonium arboreum, Eucalyptus sp., Leucodendron hybrid, Cymbidium hybrid, Cornus sericea

Floral Friday: Group Show

Euonymus japonica 'Aureo Variegata'

Euonymus japonicus ‘Aureo Variegata’ and Helleborus x hybridus, highlighting a self-portrait.


After a few years of purchasing ceramics, my collection has grown to a considerable size, constructed of many different periods, styles and shapes.  My justification for a new addition is that it must be a striking piece on its own, with or without flowers. Sometimes I enjoy grouping single arrangements of different styles together, similar as to how I would display a grouping of pots of annuals. If I can play with the colors and shapes to match a piece of artwork, then it’s another win.  With this type of display I can easily put more pieces of my collection out rather than one at a time while still showcasing beautiful blooms or foliage, and tying it in nicely with the surrounding art, making for a nice group show.  – James


5 Favorite Tips

Zinnias1.   Joyous and carefree as the halcyon summer days can be, zinnias bedazzle us with their unabashed brilliance.  They look as if a child had gone unsupervised with a box of 1000 Crayola crayons, coloring with singular doggedness each flower. Zinnias are a fitting preclude before….. (Zappy Zinnias)

Magnolia petals2. Each year happens the same, the weather gets warmer and before we know it,  we are  barraged by this festival of blooms called springtime. It seems there is barely enough time to enjoy one flower display before the next one is vying for our attention, screaming out our name to be looked at and admired. Or, we can see this as the moment you can push the boundaries of  bloom time…. (Pushing Bloom Boundaries)

Cut Iceland poppies stand out against the pop art painting (private home, Tasmania, Australia)

Cut Iceland poppies stand out against the pop art painting (private home, Tasmania, Australia)

3. Poppies are best cut early in the morning when the bud begins to reveal some color. They then should be  plunged into… (Prolonging Cut Poppies)

Myosotis sylvatica

Myosotis sylvatica

4. Don’t forget to take notes, it is important to document your successes and failures including ideas you might want to improve upon for next year in the garden, such as…  (Noting Notes)

Jewel tones of Geranium [Rozanne] = 'Gerwat' and Eschscholzia californica 'Jelly Beans' with Nassella tenuissima

Jewel tones of Geranium [Rozanne] = ‘Gerwat’ and Eschscholzia californica ‘Jelly Beans’ with Nassella tenuissima

5. Geranium [Rozanne] = ‘Gerwat’ may be ubiquitous, dethroning ‘Johnson’s Blue’, but it doesn’t preclude it from being…. (Blue and Orange Deux)

Floral Fridays: Hellebores Floating in a Bowl

Hellebore_Floating_Bowl_Pine_Knot_FarmsCut hellebore stems do not last long in arrangements unless they are picked when the anthers have dropped and seed carpels somewhat developed. Instead a more successful arrangement would to cut individual flowers and float them in a shallow basin where their colors and patterns can be admired up-close rather than bending down on knees in the garden. ~ Eric

Not for the ladies

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It always seems that at weddings the women always get the pleasure of noticeably being the most stylish. Well, this tip is not for the ladies, but for the gentlemen out there.  There is no need to stiff on style when it comes to getting dressed for a wedding or important event, a buttonhole is simply needed to adorn your attire.  I am a huge fan of this man’s style and have made a mental note to keep the scheme simple and tie it all together with color. Here is Rosa ‘Laurent Carle ‘ which is not only matched by the tie and pocket square color, but the folds in the pocket square resembling the overlapping petals of the rose bloom. Perfection need not be complicated, but something worth remembering…  – James

An affair to remember..

Dear Eric,

There was a wonderful wedding here in Holland, she was a beautiful bride with a radiant smile and he an equally handsome groom with a sharp sense of humor,  there was happiness and laughter all around. The ceremony was in Dutch and English, with delicious food and drink at the reception, and everyone got in some serious dance time with the amazing band that performed. It was a joyous time for all, for good reason.

It was my first time doing floral arrangements for a wedding and found the whole experience to be challenging but a wholly satisfying creative process.  Most of the foliage and flowers were grown on and harvested from the estate, from which there was plenty to choose from.  Church interiorThe church looked small from the outside, but upon entering, it was as if we had stepped into a jewel-box, with such colors and ornate details inside, we thought it best to keep the color schemes of the arrangements simple, to enhance rather than compete with the exquisite surroundings.  We thought some large green and white arrangements would suit the church interior best, and took notice of some of the details on the walls too, which could come into play later.

Church interior detail

 Some of these details that stood out were the leaves and acorn ornamentation painted onto the columns.

Church arrangements

Once back at the estate, we harvested young oak saplings (that needed to be thinned anyway) of Quercus robur, which surprisingly lasts well in water for a few days. We used these to connect with the oak leaves painted within the interior of the church. The edge of the woods were lit up with foxglove blooms so we harvested all the white ones, Digitalis alba, to add some major height to the arrangements. Mixed with the oak, they were simple, large, and very effective.  To some of the other arrangements red dahlias were added to highlight the red used throughout the frames of the religious icons and triptychs in the church, again keeping within the simple color scheme chosen.

Dining areaFor the reception dinner,  the arrangements were kept simple too, using glass vases of sweet peas running down the center of the table.

Untitled-1Table space was limited, partly due to large plates that were to be kept on the table as ‘dishes to pass’, as well as all the glasses and cutlery, so we found we were restricted and could not make many large arrangements. A solution to decorating the table was pressing some ferns, specifically Blechnum spicant, which was done a few weeks prior to the wedding, and running the dried fronds down the center of the tables.  Blechnum spicant, which was harvested from the ‘Wild Garden’ on the estate pressed really well, holding its shape and color while adding that other dimension needed to the beautifully set tables.

IMG_9858Untitled-1

The area where dinner was held is actually a large garage that was converted into a more welcoming space by hanging swags of fabric and ribbon while using a some large arrangements to help soften the space.  In these tall but thin cylindrical vases, I squeezed as much as I could fit, not wanting to make too heavy of an arrangement, so I focused on height while keeping them light, airy and somewhat open. All materials were foraged from the garden and the estate which included Cornus alba ‘Aurea’, Astrantia major ‘Ruby Wedding’, Prunus branches from the kitchen garden (it was either us or the birds that harvested the cherries) and for height a variegated Miscanthus and reeds that grow alongside the moats.

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 Elsewhere, I used pear branches, heavy with young fruit, mixed with the scented Philadelphus coronarius, which were surrounded by pots of wild strawberry plants.

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Some last minute arrangements thrown together, using more oak and peonies, a combination that I would like to try more of. IMG_0044It was an honor to be part of such a wedding and to do flowers for wonderful friends, and pleasurable to have acres of greens and flowers at your fingertips to choose from. It was so much fun thinking of ideas, trialling cut branches for longevity (Salix did not last at all, surprisingly, while Castanea sativa lasted really long, can you believe it?), and seeing everything come together as one hoped for. I only wish time slowed down during this day, so the joy and pleasure of the day could’ve been savored longer by all who attended..  Hope this finds you well my friend…….        – James

Bloom, cut, repeat

Angelica arrangements

While working in the garden yesterday, I had to remove  some Angelica archangelica, a large hardy biennial  that can reach up to 8 feet ( 2.5 metres) tall in height. Its height, the thickness of its stems, and the blooms are all strong characteristics of this plant.  After removing a few flowering stems,  I took them home and threw this together.   If you find making arrangements intimidating then keep it simple. Take a cue from Karl Blossfeldt by focusing on one detail of a plant, and then simply repeat it by arranging in a group of similar vessels.